Manager and Chairman of the Board

 

 

Lumber species of the month.... American Mahogany

 

Characteristics....

This wood can vary considerably in color. When freshly cut it may be yellowish, reddish, pinkish or salmon – pink. It matures to a deep rich red or brown with time. The grain ranges from straight to ropey, curly or wavy.

Grain irregularities produce very attractive figures such as mottle, stripe or rope, blister and fiddleback. It has a fine or medium to coarse uniform texture and white deposits or dark gum show in the pores. American mahogany is highly lustrous and golden.

 

Properties....
American mahogany has very low stiffness and resistance to shock loads, and medium crushing strength. Although it has a low bending strength, it steam-bends moderately well.

Provided sharp tools are used, it works easily with both hand and machine tools. It screws, nails, glues and stains well, and can be brought to an excellent polished finish.

 

Durability....
The hardwood is very durable and resistant to both white rot fungi and brown rot. The sapwood is vulnerable to attack from the powder-post and common furniture beetles. The  sapwood is resistant to preservative treatments and the heartwood is highly resistant.

 

Origin...

Central America and northern South America

 

Common uses....
High quality furniture and cabinetry, reproduction furniture, boat interiors, interior joinery and paneling, musical instruments, canoes and shipbuilding. Very decorative veneers may be obtained.

 

Availability...
Due to cost considerations ( > $15 per board foot ), we don’t normally stock American mahogany, however we do stock sapele which is about $5 a board foot and with similar characteristics and is difficult to distinguish from mahogany. 

 

We have about 40 board feet of sapele in 4/4 S3S and 6/4 rough.